Techniques and Tips

Information

Techniques and Tips

Get the know how on savvy techniques and tips. Share time-saving techniques that you've learned.

Members: 29
Latest Activity: Dec 4, 2013

Links to Video Techs/Tips

Discussion Forum

Make a Corset Back

Started by Jo Ann Ely. Last reply by Alethia Aug 19, 2011. 2 Replies

Making Flared Cuffed pants

Started by Jo Ann Ely. Last reply by Alethia Aug 19, 2011. 4 Replies

Pattern Filing System

Started by Alethia. Last reply by Lillie Bender Jun 4, 2011. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Techniques and Tips to add comments!

Comment by Greta Gay on October 20, 2010 at 12:32pm
Okay so that was one dart, now do the other dart the same way. You will have 4 extra inches on your waist band and fat butt area. Because my suit jacket is just below my waist, the lace shows when I walk and people always ask me if I did that--because they know I sew.
Comment by Greta Gay on October 20, 2010 at 12:03pm
Pants too tight to button: Add black stretch lace to pants for more comfort (4 inches). IF you need it – the pants will stretch, if you don’t need it the pants stay put and looks pretty. Here goes--
Tipster: (Back darts) Starting at the top of the waist band over the darts; measure to the end of the darts (at the back of the pants) (6inches); cut the entire length of waist band to end of dart open; cut 1 inch on both sides of the end of dart (=2inch gap); on right side facing down, fold over each 1 inch side and press down (that’s the pants); NOW, cut two pieces of stretch lace giving 1 additional inch on 4 sides (8X4); cut 2 pieces of stretch lining the same size as lace (for lining white or black; I do the same color as pants); With right sides together sew 1/2 inch on 3 sides; on the 4th side which should be a short side leave 1 inch for turning; TURN then sew the last inch down; place the lace patch on top of opening on the wrong side of pants; (this means you will have the lace on the right side when finished, right?); pin the patch in place by attaching the 3 sides (2 long sides and top) leave the bottom open; sew the patch to the pants starting at the bottom—THEN to the top—at the top (fold ½ inch across) sew across THEN sew down other side; STOP; this is now the tricky part. You should have the bottom open, patch and raw end of dart—take the pants out of the machine fold pants down and cut the 2 corners of the open raw edge just a pinch (1/2 inch) THEN hold together with patch and sew across (this should be done on the wrong (inside) of the pants –THEN take out of machine and iron the entire patch down. NOW go back and put a zig zag stitch over the 4 sides of patch on the RIGHT SIDE of pants to finish off. Use black thread of course. DONE
Comment by Alethia on October 19, 2010 at 11:57pm
Greta, that's a great idea about the peek-a-boo lace! Very chic and stylish.
I would love to hear more about how you add the stretch silk patches to give you more room~ this is a technique worth mentioning. Thanks!
Comment by Greta Gay on October 19, 2010 at 10:27am
I checked out Sally's tip and that's great. Just want to add that I used black lace fabric the same way to patch my jeans and it's kinda cute, gives that peek-a-boo effect. Especially on the butt of the jeans. I also did this to create more room in my jeans instead of stripping the seams and adding fabric. Putting two patches of stretch silk does the trick for me. Woot!
Comment by Sew Much Talent on October 19, 2010 at 9:40am
Your favorite pair of jeans has holes in them, and you can't seam to part with them? And, you're not quite ready to transform them into something else?
Well, Sally's got a tip for you that will have you rock'n those jeans in no time. Check out her blogspot Sally Ann at sallyannk.blogspot.com.
Sally has been a member here for a minute, but, like most of us, she has her own website where she shares great tutorials on many of her sewing projects, especially her recon projects~ great stuff!
So visit her blogspot today. And, while you're here, visit Sally's page and make a new sewing buddy today.
Comment by Alethia on September 24, 2010 at 7:30am
Sew,Mama, Sew! has a great tips on choosing the right zippers for your project. Go to Sew,Mama,Sew! website and chekout Guide for Zippers
Check it out!
Comment by Alethia on July 21, 2010 at 8:24am
Thanks, ladies, for your comments.
A couple of you sais that you use the serger for your rolled hems, so I started questioning, "How could you use a serger for this type of hem?" As someone pointed out to me, there's a difference in the hem I'm talking about as opposed to the type the serger produces.
The rolled hem that the feet I showed produces, is called a narrow rolled hem-because it does just that, makes the hem really narrow. This type of hem you find a lot on men's shirts, formal dress with flair skirts, etc. The type of rolled hem that the serger produces is called a edged rolled hem--this type of hem can be found on napkins, skirts or tops with very lightweight soft fabrics, knit garments, flounces on sleeves, etc.
Here are samples of each:

Rolled hem with a standard sewing machine

Rolled hem using a serger

Rolled hem using the manual method

Ladies, this has been a great topic. Your feedback has been great!
@ Candi--I learned the rolled hem technique manually, first. I was at a small boutique soing alterations on fine clothing--this is how they did it. However, now that I'm doing alterations at a one of the largest bridal chains, we use the rolled hem foot, which produces the same results, but much faster. Cuts your steps down. You should look into it since you do a lot of formal wear. I'm all about cutting my work time down.

Okay, ladies, any suggestions for next week's topic of discussion??
Comment by Candi Roetman on July 20, 2010 at 8:59am
I use the 'old fashioned' method - of weighting the hem with thread, as Alethia mentioned. Maybe if I had a serger I would do it differently. I don't want to take the time to figure out the rolled hem foot; this mehod works well for me even if it is a little more time consuming.
Comment by karmen rodgers on July 20, 2010 at 1:07am
I like to the rolled hem using my serger. It's quick, easy and looks really professional. I use it all the time.
Comment by Alethia on July 19, 2010 at 10:15pm
Thanks!
How does that work on the serger? I've serged napkins or something of that nature using a rolled hem. I would love to know more, especially about the water soluble technique.
 

Members (28)

 
 
 

Hottest Content! 

Events

Badge

Loading…

FACEBOOK LINK

Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

Members

Discussion Forum

Make a Corset Back

Started by Jo Ann Ely. Last reply by Alethia Aug 19, 2011. 2 Replies

Making Flared Cuffed pants

Started by Jo Ann Ely. Last reply by Alethia Aug 19, 2011. 4 Replies

Shortening a Wedding dress with Horsehair Braid

Started by Jo Ann Ely. Last reply by Alethia May 28, 2011. 1 Reply

How to Shorten a Separating Zipper

Started by Alethia Dec 28, 2010. 0 Replies

Pattern Filing System

Started by Alethia. Last reply by Lillie Bender Jun 4, 2011. 1 Reply

© 2014   Created by Alethia.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

<